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Rindsgulasch – Austrian Beef Stew

Thick cuts of boneless short rib cook Viennese-style in a dark and flavorful gravy until the meat is fork-tender; it is everything you expect from the rindsgulasch or Austrian beef stew. Ours is flavored traditionally with hot and sweet paprika and peppery caraway.

Finish the meal with egg butter-infused egg noodles for the ultimate comfort meal.

A scoop of Austrian beef stew shown over the Dutch oven filled to the brim with the same.

The term ‘goulash’ dates back to the 9th century Hungary; it’s said to have been eaten by shepherds while they went to pasture with the sheep. The dish has transformed overtime, with most of the world creating their own version of the dish.

Unlike Hungarian goulash, the Austrian version is known for its thick, bright-colored gravy attributed to the heavy use of paprika to flavor the dish. Onions slow cook to build the perfect gravy and caraway seeds and fresh dill complete the meal, adding flavor, brightness, and aromatics.

WHAT YOU NEED TO MAKE THIS RECIPE

  • Paprika: Responsible for the bright color, paprika is the primary flavor in our rindsgulasch. You’ll love the combination of sweet and hot paprika. For best results, I suggest using fresh Hungarian-sourced paprika. If you only want to purchase one, make it sweet paprika and add a teaspoon of cayenne to balance the sweetness.
  • Boneless Short Rib: The tenderness of the short rib as it cooks down in the gravy is unrivaled. You can use chuck roast or a more traditional beef shank or shoulder if you prefer, but you seriously can’t go wrong with short rib. Beef is the meat of choice; pork and veal are sometimes used.
  • Butter: Butter sautés the onions, and flavors the goulash.
  • Onion: Since traditional goulash doesn’t use flour or roux, onions do the job, resulting in a rich, concentrated gravy.
  • Caraway Seed: Caraway seeds provide a peppery-citrus flavor.
  • Garlic: I suggest using two cloves, but don’t let my recipe tell you how much garlic to use – go for it.
  • Better Than Bouillon: I use Better Than Bouillon and water in place of stock. It’s flavorful, easy, and something I always keep in my pantry.
  • Tomato Paste: Use tomato paste to thicken and flavor the stew.
  • Bay Leaves: Like any good thing, you don’t appreciate it until it’s gone. The same is true of bay leaves, used to subtly flavor the stew.
  • Fresh Dill: Dill compliments the beef and caraway. You may be tempted to leave it out, don’t! Make it as is, and enjoy the tasty combination of rich gravy paired with bright, fresh dill. By the time you finish your plate, I am sure you will be saying, “give me all the dill.”
  • Apple Cider Vinegar: Apple cider vinegar provides the right amount of acidity to highlight the richness of the gravy.
  • Sour Cream: Garnish the stew with sour cream.
  • Salt + Pepper

HOW TO MAKE RINDSGULASCH

A small bowl full of spices that make up the Austrian beef stew rub and seasoning.

MIX- Preheat oven to 325° F | 162° C and combine one tablespoon of sweet paprika, salt, and pepper in a small bowl. Coat the beef with the mixture and set it aside at room temperature.

Since there is no roux in Austrian beef stew, onions slow cook down to build the concentrated flavor for the dish.

SAUTE- In a Dutch oven, melt butter on low-medium heat. Add onion and cook until caramelized and softened. This step will take a while, and that’s okay. You’re building flavor.

Spices enrich of the onions to create the base flavor for the Austrian beef stew.

STIR- Stir in the caraway seeds and minced garlic. Then, add hot paprika and the remaining five tablespoons of sweet paprika. Cook for about 30 seconds, until fragrant.

Tomato paster, bouillon, and water are added to the cooked down spiced onion mixture to create the gravy for Austrian beef stew.

WHISK- Slowly whisk in the water, Better than Bouillon, tomato paste, and simmer.

Austrian beef stew ready to cook in the Dutch oven after aromatic bay leaves are added.

COMBINE AND BAKE- Next, add the reserved beef and bay leaves to the Dutch oven. Cover and cook in the oven for 2 hours.

Austrian beef stew basting in the oven and slow cooking for maximum flavor.

BAKE- Remove the pot from the oven; give it a quick stir, and return it to the oven uncovered to cook for another hour.

Fresh dill and apple cider vinegar are added to finish the Austrian beef stew.

FINISH- Let stand for 5-10 minutes. Deglaze with apple cider vinegar, finish with fresh dill, and stir to combine.

A single serving of Austrian beef stew over buttery egg noodles.

SERVE- Garnish with more dill and sour cream. Serve with buttery egg noodles.

SEARCHING FOR MORE LIKE THIS? 

If you love this recipe, we hope you will try one of these tasty soups and stews!

RIndsgulasch served over egg noodles.

CAN I MAKE THIS RECIPE IN THE INSTANT POT?

Don’t have the time to wait for rindsgulasch to cook in the oven? Cut the cooking time in half by making our Instant Pot Austrian goulash.

SERVING SUGGESTIONS

  • Egg Noodles
  • Mashed Potatoes
  • Boiled Potatoes
  • White Rice
  • Mashed Cauliflower
  • Roasted Potatoes
  • Semmel Knoedel (Bread Dumplings)
  • Potato Pancakes
  • Traditional Spätzle.

WHAT TO DO WITH LEFTOVERS 

  • FRIDGE – Store leftovers in an air-tight container; it will keep for 4 days.
  • FREEZE – I suggest freezing the rindsgulasch separately and preparing fresh noodles. First, allow the stew to cool completely, then add it to a freezer-safe container or bag. It will freeze for up to three months. When you’re ready to eat, defrost it in the fridge overnight.
  • REHEAT – Warm it on a stovetop, and prepare your sides.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What cut of beef is used for goulash?

Beef shank is the most traditional cut to use for rindsgulasch. However, I prefer the taste of boneless short ribs. Chuck roast is a great alternative.

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A scoop of Austrian beef stew shown over the Dutch oven filled to the brim with the same.

Rindsgulasch – Austrian Beef Stew

Tressa Jamil
Thick cuts of boneless short rib cook Viennese-style in a dark and flavorful gravy until the meat is fork-tender; it is everything you expect from the rindsgulasch or Austrian beef stew.
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 3 hrs 30 mins
Total Time 3 hrs 45 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine Austrian
Servings 8 servings
Calories 98 kcal

Equipment

Ingredients
  

  • 6 tablespoon sweet paprika, divided
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper, coarse ground
  • 5 pounds short rib, boneless, cut into 1½- inch pieces
  • 4 tablespoons butter, salted
  • 2 large yellow onions, finely diced
  • 2 tablespoons caraway seed
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon hot paprika
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon Beef Better Than Bouillion
  • ½ cup tomato paste
  • 3 bay leaves
  • ¼ cup fresh dill, chopped, plus more for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 package egg noodles, cooked according to package
  • sour cream, for garnish

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 325° F | 162° C and combine one tablespoon of sweet paprika, salt, and pepper in a small bowl. Coat the beef with the mixture and set it aside at room temperature.
  • In a Dutch oven, melt butter on low-medium heat. Add onion and cook until caramelized and softened. This step will take a while, and that's okay. You're building flavor.
  • Stir in the caraway seeds and minced garlic. Then, add hot paprika and the remaining five tablespoons of sweet paprika. Cook for about 30 seconds, until fragrant.
  • Slowly whisk in the water, Better than Bouillon, tomato paste, and simmer.
  • Next, add the reserved beef and bay leaves to the Dutch oven. Cover and cook in the oven for 2 hours.
  • Remove the pot; give it a quick stir, and return it to the oven uncovered to cook for another hour.
  • Let stand for 5-10 minutes. Deglaze with apple cider vinegar, finish with fresh dill, and stir to combine.
  • Garnish with more dill and sour cream. Serve with buttery egg noodles.

Notes

 
  • Adapted From: This was another recipe from Milkstreet I simply had to try! I loved it so much I made an Instant Pot version of the same recipe. 
 
  • Slowly Cook the Beef: Beef takes time to break down; I suggest at least 3 hours for the meat to become fork-tender.
 
  • Traditional Gravy: Traditional Austrian goulash does not contain flour or roux. Instead, it relies heavily on onions to create a thick, tasty gravy. We do the same in this recipe, so be sure to reserve enough time for the onions to cook down. It’s worth it! 
 
  • Next Day Goulash: It’s a well-known fact that goulash tastes better the next day. If you enjoy rindsgulasch on night one, wait until you dig into the leftovers. 
 
  • Nutrition Disclosure: The nutritional information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for professional advice.
 
  • Web Story: Check out our web story for rindsgulasch!

Nutrition

Serving: 1 servingCalories: 98kcalCarbohydrates: 9gProtein: 2gFat: 7gSodium: 778mgFiber: 2gSugar: 4g
Keyword rindsgulasch
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